Sometimes life just takes the biscuit …
Abby Spencer knows she can come across as an airhead – she talks too much and is a bit of a klutz – but there’s more to her than that. Though she sacrificed her career to help raise her sisters, a job interview at biscuit company Crumbs could finally be her chance to shine. That’s until she hurries in late wearing a shirt covered in rusk crumbs, courtesy of her baby nephew, and trips over her handbag.

Managing director Douglas Faulkner isn’t sure what to make of Abby Spencer with her Bambi eyes, tousled hair and ability to say more in the half-hour interview than he manages in a day. All he knows is she’s a breath of fresh air and could bring a new lease of life to the stale corporate world of Crumbs. To his life too, if he’d let her.

But Doug’s harbouring a secret. He’s not the man she thinks he is.

 

 

My review

‘Never judge a book by its cover’ is a sentence you often hear. But it’s a fact that that cover is exactly what you see in the first place. To me it’s very important because it tells me straight away whether I want to read it or not. The same thing happens with the title. When he appeals to me, I will read the book of not, it will remain on the shelf.
For this book I can already tick those two boxes.
But not only this is important. The first sentence often makes or breaks a story for me as strange as this may sound. Box three ticked as well.
And that leaves the story itself of course. Well, that is easy. I loved it. It is a fluently written read with lots of banter that makes you smile but sometimes you also have to keep a tissue handy.
I had the feeling there was room for a sequel? Or even two or three? I would not mind it at all. 5 stars.

Thank you Kathryn Freeman and Choc Lit.

 

About the author

Kathryn was born in Wallingford, England but has spent most of her life living in a village near Windsor. After studying pharmacy in Brighton she began her working life as a retail pharmacist. She quickly realised that trying to decipher doctor’s handwriting wasn’t for her and left to join the pharmaceutical industry where she spent twenty happy years working in medical communications. In 2011, backed by her family, she left the world of pharmaceutical science to begin life as a self-employed writer, juggling the two disciplines of medical writing and romance. Some days a racing heart is a medical condition, others it’s the reaction to a hunky hero…

With two teenage boys and a husband who asks every Valentine’s Day whether he has to bother buying a card again this year (yes, he does) the romance in her life is all in her head. Then again, her husband’s unstinting support of her career change goes to prove that love isn’t always about hearts and flowers – and heroes can come in many disguises.