When a step out of line means a fight to the death…

London 1967. A working girl is brutally murdered in a Soho club. Rina Walker takes out the killer and attracts the attention of a sinister line-up of gangland enforcers with a great deal to prove.

When a member of British Military Intelligence becomes aware of her failure to fulfil a contract issued by an inmate of Broadmoor, he forces her into the deadly arena of the Cold War, with orders to kill an enemy agent.

Rina needs to call upon all her dark skills, not simply to survive but to protect the ones she loves.

 

 

Guest post

Today I am happy to share a guest post, written by the author. Enjoy!

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Background to the Rina Walker Series

 

 

I have always collected the black and white photographs of Roger Mayne and Bert Hardy who captured so many evocative images of the poverty and dilapidation of the post-war inner cities.
Roger Mayne’s series depicting the street life of Notting Hill and North Kensington in the 1950s I  found particularly evocative, with Teddy Boys in their drainpipe trousers and drape jackets, andTeddy Girls in pencil skirts and tailored jackets with velvet collars, strutting their stuff, while raggedy little kids in threadbare clothes play football and hopscotch, or gather on the steps of the tenements.
I became familiar with this world when I lived in Notting Hill as a student, in the early
1960s, also with the occasionally dangerous atmosphere of the pubs and clubs of the area where there’d often be a group of men in dark suits and Fedora hats, that one would treat with caution.
With racial tension very much alive, in the period preceding the Notting Hill Race riots there was frequently a certain tension in the air.
It was in this neighbourhood and this kind of poverty that I imagined my heroine Rina
Walker growing up, the daughter of a recently murdered gangster and and alcoholic mother, forced into a life of crime at an early age in order to care for and support her two younger siblings and all too soon acquiring the skills and expertise of a contract killer.

Thank you, Hugh Fraser and LoveBooksTours

 

About the author

Hugh Fraser is best known for playing Captain Hastings in Agatha Christie’s ‘Poirot’ and the Duke of Wellington in ‘Sharpe’. His films include Patriot Games, 101 Dalmatians, The Draughtsman’s Contract and Clint Eastwood’s Firefox. In the theatre he has appeared in Teeth’n’Smiles at the Royal Court and Wyndhams and in several roles with the Royal Shakespeare Company. He also composed the theme to Rainbow!

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