After Whorl: Bran Reborn – Nancy Jardine / #Interview #BlogTour @rararesources @nansjar

 

 

AD 71 Northern Roman Britain
Ravaged at the Battle of Whorl, Brennus of Garrigill is irrevocably changed. He embraces a new identity as Bran, vowing to avert Roman domination of Brigantia. Though how, when he and Ineda – his healer’s granddaughter – are forced to labour for the Roman IX Legion? Trading with the usurpers provides opportunities for gathering information, but after they are attacked by a Roman patrol, Ineda cannot be found.

Distraught with her loss, can Bran find a new occupation?

The adventures of the Garrigill Clan continue…

 

 

Q&A

  1. Did or do you like to read comic books/grapic novels? Which ones?

I loved reading comics as a child during the 1960s but I don’t read them now. I’d go to the newsagents every Friday after school to pick up the ‘comics pile’. My ones were: Bunty; Judy; Diana; June & School Friend (girly ones- a sexist comment, I know, but read on…)

My sister, 4 years older, wasn’t such a great reader as I was but her comics were: Topper; Beezer; Beano and Dandy.(boy ones) I’d read all of mine over the weekend, cover to cover, catching up with the adventures of characters like ‘Sandra of the Secret Ballet’ and ‘Wee Slavey, the Victorian kitchen maid’. Then, Monday to Thursday, in between devouring my books borrowed from the local library, I’d read my sister’s comics for the silly exploits of ‘Oor Wullie and Desperate Dan’ etc.

  1. Whom did you inherit your love for books/reading from?

My dad. He was a great reader and rarely watched T.V. He preferred to escape into the worlds of Conan Doyle, or H. Rider Haggard. My mum read a couple of Women’s’ magazines, but reading novels were rare for her till I was a teenager, by which time she claimed to have more reading time. It was always my dad who walked the couple of miles to the library with me, sometimes every week, or every fortnight, where I borrowed my maximum quota. I also borrowed on my sister’s library ticket to get even more books. Like my dad, I borrowed some non-fiction (books on Ancient Egypt, or Greek Tales) but mostly fiction. Dad took his knapsack, a WW2 relic, which he stuffed with all the books to carry home on his back, so that I didn’t have to lug home the big fat Enid Blyton Adventure books.

  1. When you need a murder victim or someone you can diagnose with a serious disease or someone who is involved in a fatal accident do you sometimes picture someone nasty you have met in real life and think ‘got you’ LOL?

Ha! No! That’s a great question. Though, it’s something that I might just remember if I ever write true crime novels. My contemporary mystery / thriller Topaz Eyes has a murder and some spiteful double dealings but the characters/victims aren’t based on anyone I know. I don’t recall thinking of anyone specific when writing the more brutal bits in After Whorl: Bran Reborn.

  1. How do you come up with the names for your characters?

I use online ‘Baby names’ sources for many of my characters reflecting a particular trait they have. Or I choose one that’s suitable for a location e.g. for my Celtic Characters I find Gaelic names or anglicized versions of them, sometimes with a suitable meaning for the character. In After Whorl: Bran Reborn Brennus can mean king, or prince, or raven. Since Brennus is blonde the raven doesn’t fit his colouring, but he does acquire druidic connections so that aspect is appropriate, the raven being an important druidic creature.

  1. Do write other things beside books (and shoppinglists 😉 )?

I’ve only written one short story and had it published in an anthology. That one was for a charity anthology which my (then) publisher created, with about twenty Crooked Cat Books authors contributing to it. The short story is about a couple of minor characters in Topaz Eyes. Otherwise, I write a blog. There are phases when it’s really busy and others when it’s a bit neglected.

  1. If your movie or series would be made from your books, would you be happy with the ‘based on’ version or would you rather like they showed it exactly the way you created it?

What a fine question! I’d obviously rather the ‘exactly as I created version’ but with full length historical novels, especially a series, that’s not always possible. Run time for an episode, or film, means there’s always something left out, or adjusted. I can enjoy ‘based on’ films but if they stray too far from the book then it doesn’t seem fair on the original author when it’s only/mainly their ideas that are used. However, any ‘knock-on’ publicity would naturally be amazing either way!

  1. Who would you like/have liked to interview?

Cornelius Tacitus. He was an ancient Roman writer who wrote about his father-in-law General Gnaeus Iulius Agricola, the general who was in charge of the Ancient Roman invasion campaigns in the North of England and of Caledonia (Scotland) around A.D. 78-84. Translations of the writing of Tacitus are the main source material we have for studying Ancient Roman Britain in first century A.D. Unfortunately, it’s clear that some of Tacitus’ original scrolls went missing and were probably never copied or translated in antiquity. I’d love to ask him what the missing ‘books’ contained because they would maybe explain a lot more about the Roman advances and retreats in Caledonia during Agricola’s time of office. And Tacitus could tell me who came after Agricola as Governor of Britain – because non-one really knows!

  1. Do you have certain people you contact while doing research to pick their brains? What are they specialized in?

When I embarked on the writing of After Whorl: Bran Reborn, I contacted a fellow Crooked Cat Books author named Dr. Mark Patton. Mark’s also a writer of Ancient Worlds novels and is an archaeologist. He helped point out some excellent sources and mentioned a few other people and places I could get help from. Since then (2013) I’ve been on a number of ‘history’ Facebook groups, and I’ve joined various societies – like the Historical Novel Society –  whose members are all brilliant at sharing information and help when needed.

  1. Is there someone you sometimes discuss a dilemma with?

Occasionally something happens that I share with my fellow authors at Ocelot Press. They all pitch in and give really excellent advice. There are also other author friends in some Facebook groups like ‘Historical Writers Forum’ who regularly share their knowledge and help with problems. ALLi (Alliance of Independent Authors) is also a great place to get help from.

  1. What is more important to you : a rating in stars with no comments or a reviewer who explains what the comments they give are based on (without spoilers of course)

Great question. Clearly a review with constructive comments is the best, in my opinion. I remember getting a 4 star review for The Beltane Choice, Book 1 of the Celtic Fervour Series. A comment made showed how confused the person was since she thought the action for the novel had taken place in Caithness. Caithness for anyone not familiar with the geography of Scotland is as far north as you can go on mainland Great Britain. The action had actually taken place in the furthest north part of England which at the time was called Northern Britannia by the Ancient Romans. I realised then that a map of the area would have been useful to avoid that confusion, so there’s been maps in all of the books of the series ever since.

Thank you, Nancy Jardine and Rachel’s Random Resources.

 

About the author 

Nancy Jardine writes historical fiction; time-travel historical adventure; contemporary mystery thrillers; and romantic comedy. She lives in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, where life is never quiet or boring since she regularly child minds her young grandchildren who happen to be her next-door neighbours. Her garden is often creatively managed by them, though she does all the work! Her husband is a fantastic purveyor of coffee and tea…excellent food and wine! (Restorative, of course) 

A member of the Historical Novel Society; Scottish Association of Writers; Federation of Writers Scotland; Romantic Novelists’ Association and the Independent Alliance of Authors, her work has achieved finalist status in UK competitions.

 

Author Links 

Blog: http://nancyjardine.blogspot.co.uk  

Website:www.nancyjardineauthor.com/  

Facebook: http://on.fb.me/XeQdkG & http://on.fb.me/1Kaeh5G

Twitter https://twitter.com/nansjar

Amazon Author page http://viewauthor.at/mybooksandnewspagehere

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5139590.Nancy_Jardine

 

 

Book Link

http://viewbook.at/heritis

 

 

 

About the author

Nancy Jardine writes historical fiction; time-travel historical adventure; contemporary mystery thrillers; and romantic comedy. She lives in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, where life is never quiet or boring since she regularly child minds her young grandchildren who happen to be her next-door neighbours. Her garden is often creatively managed by them, though she does all the work! Her husband is a fantastic purveyor of coffee and tea…excellent food and wine! (Restorative, of course)

A member of the Historical Novel Society; Scottish Association of Writers; Federation of Writers Scotland; Romantic Novelists’ Association and the Independent Alliance of Authors, her work has achieved finalist status in UK competitions.

Follow Nancy Jardine

Blog: http://nancyjardine.blogspot.co.uk

Website: www.nancyjardineauthor.com/